How the new expanded CPP can speed your Findependence Day

rpcvr-cppyr-engOn June 20th, as reported by Canadian Press here via the National Post, it was announced that the federal Government has reached an agreement with most of the provinces to expand the Canada Pension Plan, or CPP. Manitoba and Quebec have yet to agree.

As the Globe & Mail reported here, this is the first significant increase in CPP benefits since the program was launched half a century ago. CP also reported that Ontario plans to drop its controversial new Ontario Retirement Pension Plan (ORPP). Once fully implemented, maximum annual CPP benefits would rise by about a third to $17,478.

The seven-year phase-in is expected to start on Jan. 1, 2019, and will require workers and employers to pay higher contributions. Once implemented, the upper earnings limit would rise to $82,700 by 2025. That would replace one third of income up to the new higher ceiling, compared to the 25% that the current CPP replaces. See also Rob Carrick’s Globe article: The Reality of CPP Reform: We Can’t Afford Not to Make These Changes.

What follows is a guest blog by Boomer & Echo’s Robb Engen, which ran this weekend just before the announcement. Minor edits to reflect that have been made but as you can see Robb — who is also a fee-for-service financial planner — pretty much expected this to happen and is generally positive about the prospect. I certainly concur that for the Echo generation he represents, this is a positive step, and since I have a 24-year old daughter, am happy for her as well. (By the way, she is also the Hub’s Millennial blogger: you can see her recent posts that run here Saturdays, such as this one).

Added 1:30 pm. You can also find my take on this announcement online at FinancialPost.com, under the (highlighted) headline Why we should be celebrating the decision to expand the Canada Pension Plan. — Jonathan Chevreau  Read more