What can you buy for 5 bucks? Quite a lot!

fiverrI recently delivered my debut “Ice Breakers” talk at the local (Port Credit) chapter of Toastmasters, an organization I highly recommend for anyone who wants to polish their public speaking and leadership skills.

I began by pulling out a $5 bill and dropping it at my feet. I asked how many audience members would pick one up if they saw a stray fin on the sidewalk. Most would, but also admitted they probably wouldn’t bother to stoop to pick up a penny or a nickel. I also remarked that when you pull a green $20 bill out of your wallet and consider what it can purchase, your attitude to that bill’s value is probably about what it was to a purple $10 bill some two decades earlier. Inflation, it seems, is forever with us.

If this is inflation, bring it on!

But if you ever wanted a concrete demonstration of the value of a lowly blue $5 bill, then go the website fiverr.com. That’s FIVERR, a “fiver” with an extra R. You may even see ads for this site elsewhere here at FindependenceDay.com as well as at MoneySense.ca, where this blog may also appear.

FIVERR is a wonderful example of the global trend to technology-enhanced outsourcing of personal and business services. You search for some task you want performing and a bunch of people from anywhere in the world offer to take on the “gig” for as little as $5. They may want to upsell you, which is perfectly fine, but my experience with the site was it did exactly what I asked for the price offered. The cover of my new e-book released earlier this week, and shown below, was designed for $5 (US dollars, mind you!).

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My ebook cover designed by Fiverr.com

The other gig I needed to publish the e-book at Amazon was to format my Microsoft Word manuscript into the format required by the Kindle. This task too was performed for $5. I don’t  know where in the world these people are located. I assume some are in the United States but for all I know — and as in the case with 99 Designs, which we looked at a few weeks ago — it could be half way around the world, where $5 may buy what $100 purchases in North America.

You can offer gigs as well as utilize them

It costs nothing to join fiver.com and of course you’re as free to be the provider of services for $5 a gig as you are to be the purchaser.

In fact, if there are any services out there that readers think I could perform for $5, drop me a line at jonathan@findependenceday.com.

Canadian e-book on Financial Independence launches

CdnEBookCover2Today, the Canadian edition of my new “Novel Series” of e-books on Financial Independence launched on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. You can see the full title and cover in the image to the left. Those who pre-ordered should already have it on their devices.

This is the first update to the original full novel published first in Canada in 2008, and the basis for this web site. However, it is a kind of workbook companion to the novel, and at 15,000 words much shorter.

The main body of the e-book is a chapter-by-chapter summary of the story, followed by the main lessons learned by the characters. Since it’s relatively short, the price is just C$3.37 or US$2.99. (A U.S. version of the e-book launched on Nov. 3rd.)

Remember Coles Notes?

Think of it as a “Coles Notes” (or in the U.S., Cliff Notes) for people who are more interested in the content on financial independence than the story. (Come on, admit it. Remember the time in high school when you didn’t bother to read King Lear and read only the Coles Notes version! And you still got a B!)CliffnotesRomeoAndJulietCover

Or maybe you read the story once just for fun (Findependence Day, that is, not King Lear) and forgot to underline key passages containing financial lessons. This e-book is a quick refresher course and of course available on mobile devices that go where a physical book may not.

Aimed at educators, financial advisors, credit counsellors and parents

Apart from being a companion guide and refresher course for readers of the full novel, the e-books were designed for four main groups and their constituencies: teachers of finance, financial literacy or personal finance and their students; financial advisors and their clients; credit counsellors and their debt-encumbered clients; and finally parents and their children. The full books are meant to act as the “spoonful of sugar that makes the medicine go down,” the medicine being the financial lessons that have been highlighted in the short ebooks.

At its sites, Amazon provides a “Look Inside” feature that lets potential buyers sneak a free peek at the content. So you can see my new introduction, foreword and the first chapter summary. And of course, with Christmas just around the corner, Amazon also lets you specify the e-book as a gift. As you can see in our ad at the top of the new site at Findependence.TV, $3.37 is a small price to pay for something that could literally change a young person’s life. It takes just a minute to download and perhaps an hour to read.

Think that’s an exaggeration about being potentially life-changing? Read this article by a millennial who read the original novel and is now well on the way to becoming “findependent” (or at least mortgage free) by age 31.

Supplements the Novel

This ebook makes a good supplement to the novel, since it includes a few extras that were in the full U.S. edition of Findependence Day published in 2013. That includes a glossary that didn’t appear in the original Canadian novel, plus an updated bibliography of about 75 financial books from “Theo’s Kindle.” (Theo is one of two financial planner characters in the story). Most of those book listings have live links to the actual books at Amazon.

Some readers tell me they don’t own a Kindle. That doesn’t mean you can’t read these ebooks on other devices. Amazon provides a free Kindle App that lets you read Kindle ebooks on devices like the Apple iPhone and iPad, as well as the various Kindle e-readers made by Amazon.

While the U.S. edition of the full novel was available in paperback and hard cover and all e-book formats, including both Kindle and all the rest, there is still no Kindle version of the full Canadian novel. That may happen in 2015 but for those who have asked for it, we hope this new e-book is a start. And of course, it has been revised to stay current.

 

 

Introducing new e-books on Financial Independence

jonchevreau_cover-2On Tuesday, Amazon Kindle Digital Publishing released the first of my two new e-books, entitled A Novel Approach to Financial Independence.

These are not brand new projects but are short (15,000 words) summaries of Findependence Day (the financial novels shown on the right) and priced accordingly. First out is the U.S. e-book. A Canadian edition will be available next Thursday, Nov. 13 (date moved up from Nov. 24) but can be preordered now. Amazon’s “Look Inside” feature lets you read the forward, my new introduction and the first two chapters free.

Companion guide serves as teaching tools to full novel

The purpose of the new e-books is to act as a teaching tool or companion guide to accompany the full novels. Thus, they are aimed primarily at three groups: financial advisers working with individual investors; teachers of personal finance or financial literacy who work with students; and finally parents, who may want to use the full-length book to teach their children or relatives the basic principles of financial literacy or findependence.

The ebooks are priced at US$2.99 or C$3.37 (the minimum amount you can charge at Amazon and still qualify for maximum author royalties). (Note the Kindle version of the full U.S. edition costs $7.09 but sells for less on other e-book platforms, primarily through Trafford.com, Amazon.com and Barnes & Noble.com.)

Financial focus, but includes short plot summaries

The focus of the e-books is less on the story or novel, and more on the underlying financial principles. However, it does include short plot summaries of each chapter. It also summarizes in bullet point form the financial lessons associated with each chapter. (These end-of-chapter recaps already appear in the full U.S. edition and e-book but not in the original Canadian edition.)

The new e-books also include the glossary and bibliography from the full U.S. edition, and a new introduction by myself. The U.S. edition includes a forward written by certified financial planner Sheryl Garrett, and the Canadian edition again features a forward by CTV News senior financial commentator Patricia Lovett-Reid.CdnEBookCover2

While the ebooks are for the Kindle, you don’t need a Kindle to read them:  Amazon provides a free Kindle reader app that lets users of iPhones, iPads and other devices read Kindle ebooks. Amazon customers can also access the Kindle Cloud Reader, which you can find here.

Astute observers may note that the title of the ebook inverts the wording of the full U.S. book. My reasoning was that while the term “Findependence” may slowly be catching on in Canada, where the book was first published in 2008, the term is less familiar in the U.S., so the main title focuses on the more well-known phrase Financial Independence.

The ebook also includes live links to two new web sites on financial independence that are in the process of being launched in a matter of days.

The basic financial literacy lessons underlying Findependence Day

ipad-3-concept.pngWhile Findependence Day is at one level a “novel,” complete with a multi-layered plot, characters, setting etc., it’s a hybrid creation that also attempts to weave the basic lessons of financial literacy into the story.

As indicated last post, the new US edition, including the e-books, includes a feature not present in the original North American (i.e. Canadian) edition: end-of-chapter lessons of the basic concepts learned.

In retrospect, I should have done this from the get-go since the book is first and foremost a financial literacy primer.

As I create a backgrounder for the press, I’ve gone through the exercise of extracting the 18 end-of-chapter summaries (“What Jamie & Sheena learned this chapter”) into a single document. It reinforces that if you toss out the story, there’s plenty of useful material there, so much so that I sincerely believe that if anyone took every lesson to heart, they would indeed “achieve financial independence while they’re still young enough to enjoy it.”

Those who have only the Canadian edition can view the new foreword and an example of the end-of-chapter summaries by previewing the free Amazon Kindle version here. And you can get the e-book version for $3.99 or less in most tablet and e-reader formats by clicking through the Trafford link here.

But for those who would rather not, I’ve decided I’m going to roll out the 18 summaries in this blog perhaps on a weekly basis. We’ll start with chapter 1, even though that’s already available in the sneak preview:

Chapter 1 Summary: Take it to the Limit 

Topic: Credit cards and other forms of bad debt

• You can’t start building wealth until you’ve eliminated debt.

• To save, you must stop spending.

• To stop spending, you must embrace “guerrilla frugality” and be willing to make small sacrifices.

• The foundation of Financial Independence is a paid-for home.

Findependence Day is simply a contraction of Financial Independence Day.

• The key to manifesting your Findependence Day is to pick an actual date in the future and visualize it happening.

• To reinforce the idea that saving is more important than spending, take to heart the motto “Freedom, Not Stuff!”

Findependence Day USA now available on the Nook

product-device-nook-hdIn addition to the various e-book formats found at Trafford.com (see previous post), Barnes & Noble is now making the new US edition of Findependence Day available on the Nook, and at a slight discount to the regular e-book price of $3.99. Details here. Note that you can also peek at the first two chapters, table of contents and new foreword by Sheryl Garrett without having to commit to purchase.

P.S. I sometimes refer to the new American edition as Findependence Day USA to distinguish it from the original Canadian edition. However, the actual title in both versions is simply Findependence Day.

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