The “Glidepath” to Semi-Retirement

Depositphotos_11509531_s-2015My latest MoneySense Retired Money column looks at a concept called “The Glidepath” approach to semi-retirement. Click on the highlighted text for the full version, which is headlined How to Transition Into Retirement.

The “Glide Path” is a term used by veteran and now semi-retired financial advisor Warren Baldwin. At 66, Baldwin still works part-time as a senior vice president T.E. Wealth, working out of Oakville, Ont.

When used in the context of airplanes and flight, glide path is a familiar image that Baldwin’s clients easily understand. His own “glide path” to semi-retirement began three and a half years ago. “Maybe it takes five years because it takes two years to plan and get your mind around it. For me, it was coming up three years ago, when I was 63. The timing was right.”

The “Work Optional” stage of life

Another way to describe this is the “Work Optional” stage of life, a term popularized by Emeritus Retirement Solutions’ Doug Dahmer, who is a frequent contributor to the Hub’s “Decumulation” pages. See for example, this post.

See also a recent two-part review of Victory Lap Retirement by NestWealth.com’s Kate Smalley that also focuses on this “Work Optional” theme: Work while you play, play while you work: the case for Semi-Retirement. Or my Hub blog talking about the same review: The Work Optional Stage: Work because you WANT to, not because you HAVE TO. Read more

R.I.P. Traditional Retirement

 

gravestone with grass on white background

By Brandon Hill

Special to FindependenceDay.com

Does the notion of grinding it out day in and day out for the next 40 years to experience the freedom of retirement scare you? Wouldn’t you rather strive to enjoy the journey along the way?

The good news is that the traditional concept of retirement is slowly dying.

With the elimination of most employer pension plans and the fact that humans are living longer than ever, we are forced to come up with a different take on how our parents/grandparents view retirement.

Today I’ll show you two different concepts that rethink our traditional retirement model and are gaining popularity amongst the next generation of workers.

Findependence

What’s Findependence? It’s a term coined by Jon Chevreau: author, former editor-in-chief of MoneySense Magazine and founder of the Findependence Hub, an online platform and community for curated content focusing on achieving Financial Independence. “Findependence” is simply a contraction of the phrase “Financial Independence.”

Financial Independence is the point at which you work because you want to, not because you have to. It’s the tipping point where you have the right level of savings and investments working for you to provide the income you need to live your ideal life.

Think about that. It sounds very similar to our definition of retirement and at the same time totally reframes the perception of what retirement should entail. Rather than focusing on when you can stop work forever, you now shift your mindset to creating enough passive income through investing so that you can pursue anything you want.

Charitable intentions, golfing every day, or continuing to work knowing you’re doing it because you love it. In my mind, this is true financial freedom, as it allows you to make decisions based on your interests, not your financial obligations. This is living A Life of Wealth.

Financial Independence is unique to everyone’s situation. Does $35,000 of annual passive income allow you to follow your dreams of travelling the world and starting that passion product you’ve always had on your to-do list?

If so, maybe you don’t have to work until you’re 65.

So how much do you need to reach Findependence? A great rule of thumb is The Rule of 25.

The Rule of 25 is simple. Based on historical stock market data, your money will never run out if you have 25x your required annual income invested.

Need $35,000 for your idea of Findependence? You will need $875,000 saved up.

Want $60,000 a year for the rest of your life? You will then need $1,500,000.

Note: This simplified model does not include social security, pensions, inflation or taxes. Also, by working part time doing something you love in your Findependence years, you reduce the strain on your portfolio and need much less saved. Read more

The 6 steps to Financial Independence

Webinar-image-Twitter

L to R: Ed Rempel, Jon Chevreau, Mike Drak

By Ed Rempel, CPA, CFP

What is financial independence? How do you get there?

Financial independence means work is optional. You have enough money to live the way you want without having to earn money.

When you get there, life changes. You have freedom. You can do only what you enjoy or find meaningful.

If you don’t like your job or your boss, just quit. Your life is full of options. You can make the most of your own life.

When you get there, you can have a quiet confidence. You are financially secure.

Your plan should start with understanding your inner motivation and defining specifically the lifestyle you want to have once you are financially independent. It is your opportunity to determine your future.

Becoming financially independent requires planning and effort, but it is worthwhile to live a more fulfilling life. “It’s not about the money. It’s about your life.”

“Real freedom is financial freedom.” When is your Findependence Day?

Achieving financial independence is a very broad topic. Writing nearly 1,000 comprehensive, professional financial plans specifically for real Canadians has given me a deep insight into what really works.

Seminar Wednesday in Toronto

Read more

Burn Your Mortgage: The simple, powerful path to Financial Freedom

BurnMortgageFrontCover_150RGBBy Sean Cooper

Five years ago I read Jonathan Chevreau’s financial novel, Findependence Day, and it changed my life forever.

One of the central themes of the book is that the foundation of Financial Independence is a paid-for home. I wasn’t a fan of six figures of mortgage debt hanging over my head for the next 30 years, so I aimed to pay off my mortgage as quickly as possible.

A little over a year ago I reached my goal of “Findependence” when I burned my mortgage – literally. I paid off my home in Toronto in just three years by age 30. Thanks to a stroke of luck and good timing, the story went viral, making headlines around the world from the U.K. to Australia. I received hundreds of email from people congratulating me and wanting to follow in my footsteps.

This inspired to me write my new book, Burn Your Mortgage: The Simple, Powerful Path to Financial Freedom for CanadiansWith home prices skyrocketing in cities like Toronto and Vancouver, many feel like  the dream of homeownership is out of reach. I’m here to tell you that it’s not. I may have paid off my mortgage in three years, but that doesn’t mean you have to. There are simple yet effective lifestyle changes that anyone — from new buyers to experienced homeowners — can make to pay down their mortgage sooner.

Some people argue it doesn’t make sense to pay down your mortgage early with interest rates near record lows. I see it differently. Instead of using low interest rates as an excuse to pile on more debt, use them as an opportunity to pay down the single biggest debt of your lifetime: your mortgage.

Here’s an excerpt from my book that looks at why you’re most likely better off paying down your mortgage instead of investing.

Why pay down your Mortgage when you can come out ahead Investing?

Read more

ChangeRangers’ Mark Venning on Findependence & Victory Lap Retirement

markvenning

Mark Venning of ChangeRangers.com

By Mark Venning, ChangeRangers.com

Special to the Financial Independence Hub

“We’re on a bit of a crusade to change the way our society thinks about retirement.” — Jonathan Chevreau & Mike Drak

Mike Drak and Jonathan Chevreau, co-authors of Victory Lap Retirement (published, October 2016) are not the first to head out on this crusade. Apart from the material on the larger subject of aging and longevity, in my library I must have at least 19 books, in addition to the stacks of reports, studies and new models on the subject of Retirement.

Over the twenty years in the career services industry, where I worked directly with business executives in their later life transitions – leaving the corporate crow’s nest, as I call it, I can appreciate where Mike and Jonathan are coming from in their take on this. I have produced three retirement programs since 2001, and in the process suffered from metaphor madness, developing novel ways of reframing the concept of retirement and our later life journey.

However, this Drak & Chevreau volume is a welcomed new addition to this crusade. The book, by way of its novelty, weaves the conversation from the threads of a concept called Findependence, as the cornerstone of a Victory Lap Retirement.  So here we go. Rather than a traditional book review, here in this blog post, I present views of the authors as shared through interview questions with them in late October.

Authors Interview

Mark’s Q: Your co-authored book, early on, takes a shot across the bow at the “financial media & financial services industries” in the way they persist to push “Retirement” as if it were some final destination. (There seems little shift between the 1970’s London Life’s Freedom 55, to Prudential’s 2016 Race for Retirement campaigns for example.) What one new key message should marketers take from reading Victory Lap that could become a differentiator in their marketing?

Mike: The industry is using the same commercials that they used 40 years ago. The only difference is that they are now in color. The world of retirement has changed significantly over the years and most people cannot afford nor do they want to live the lifestyle portrayed in their commercials.

Banks assume more money equals better retirement, which is wrong thinking. Banks are good with the investment piece but they need to become more involved with the lifestyle piece. How can you ever know if you have enough if you do not have a firm handle on what type of retirement lifestyle you want in retirement and what that lifestyle will cost?

Mark’s Q: At one point in Chapter 3, you make the point that: “Compounding the problem is the lack of financial education our children receive in school.” You also say in Chapter 4 that the importance of financial independence is a prerequisite to the new stage of life you call “Victory Lap Retirement.”  Let’s play here. What do you think about an opportunity for you to design/deliver a “Findependence” course relatable to high school teenagers that didn’t use the word Retirement? What then would the main message sound like to them? Read more

Next Page »