Part 2 of Money on Trees Q&A on Financial Independence

Part 2 of the question-and-answer session with Money on Trees has been posted, here.

Part 1 went up last week, here.

In both cases, the focus is heavily on young people getting started in the working world and how they can establish early the habits that will lead to ultimate “findependence.”

Financial Independence Q&A with Money on Trees

Here’s a Q&A about Financial Independence conducted with Money on Trees. The first part of the interview was posted Thursday morning here, with the second part scheduled for next Tuesday.

Note that I’ll be giving a similar talk about Findependence, real estate and personal finance tonight in Brampton (Pearson Convention Center) for the Real Estate Investment Network (REIN). REIN members attending will receive an e-book version of the MoneySense Beginner’s Guide to Personal Finance, plus the just-published April issue of the magazine, and possibly a copy of Findependence Day.

The new American dream: Living debt-free and attaining findependence

bookwithelecsignConventionally, the American dream refers to a well-paid job, a family of two or three children and a new home along with a sturdy retirement nest egg. However, the impact of the economic meltdown as well as over trillion dollar student loan debt has left many to reconsider that dream. They are now introspecting a lot about the reasons for their own financial plight. Moreover, they are looking for ways to resolve the issues that plague their financial independence or “findependence.”

A new survey by Credit.com and GfK Custom Research found 25% of respondents defined their version of the American dream as being able to lead a debt-free life. Such a response comes second only to the definition of becoming financially stable by the time one reaches the age of 65.

This answer came mostly from the group who belong to the retirement age of 65 or above. In addition, 18% of the survey participants have responded that they dream to buy a house of their own, while 7% want to opt for higher studies and pay off their education loans.

Despite the continuous grim economic outlook, people are positive regarding their ability to fulfill their customized American dream. Another survey by Credit.com has revealed that 54% have a belief they are about to fulfill their dream, while another 24% declared they have already attained it. This summed up to a total of 78% who were affirmative about their retirement prospects.

The advantages of being findependent

Post the the Great Recession of 2008, Americans have chosen a path that is not wrought with underwater-mortgages, overwhelming credit card balances, tedious car loans and multiple lines of student loans.

Instead, their new road leads them to a life that is debt-free – where they’re no longer burdened with an exhausting budget, a dreadful mailbox and life that’s controlled by the debt collectors and spiralling interest rates.

There are numerous benefits to living debt-free that would entice anyone living on the edge of bankruptcy to start following a debt management  strategy to get rid of his or her financial woes. Some are as follows:

Reduced interest charges – CreditCards.com has said that, on an average, rate of interest on credit cards is 14.95%. The average credit card debt for the consumer carrying a balance is almost $5,000. So, a lot of interest is paid by people that is also weighing down their monthly budgets. However, these are just the averages. For people with bad credit histories, the rate of interest could be several notches higher. Hence, being debt-free allows you to steer clear of wasting your hard-earned money on interests that would leave little tangible benefit for you to use at a later stage.

Increased retirement fund – According to a combined statistical data compiled by the Federal Reserve, the U.S Census Bureau and the Internal Revenue Service (IRS) of 2012, 25% of American households do not have any savings whatsoever. What’s more surprising is the average retirement fund is only $35,000. Indeed, avoiding sky-high interest debts could leave these people with more disposable income. It isn’t difficult to understand there are numerous ways to dodge long-term debt.

More, they could even find out the ways to direct their income as well as increase their savings at the end of it all. The bottom line is the absence of monthly bills with exorbitant interest lets you save all the more aggressively for retirement, home purchase, college and even build up an emergency fund.

Finally, that one benefit sought by everyone is complete solace and peace of mind. Hence, being debt free and attaining financial independence would translate into a life with less worries. These are a few of the advantages of findependence that you cannot support with a survey report or reflect through statistics.

 This blog was written by Zindaida Grace, a financial writer and researcher associated with the Oak View Law Group.  

 

 

Findependence Day for Teens

I’ve not previously given this site over to guest bloggers before but I really liked the concept of Findependence Day for Teens, so I’m happy to run this piece by Dave Landry Jr., a debt relief counsellor who recently has begun to blog. Over to you, Dave!

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Findpendence Day for Teens

By Dave Landry Jr.

It’s doubtful many teenagers think about financial independence. After all, middle age, not to mention old age, is as far away as it can be and the idea of saving for the future when you have so much of it in front of you doesn’t seem like a priority. Of course, this doesn’t mean that many teenagers don’t plan their financial futures, but it does mean that all of them should. The reasoning is the same for a teenager as it is for an adult: Namely, the sooner you begin planning for your findependence day, the sooner you can achieve it. And believe it or not there are many things that most teenagers can start doing right away to ensure that their financial independence comes sooner rather than later.

1.) Stay out of debt. Since it’s doubtful you’ll have the income to put down a payment on a house, what we’re talking about here is consumer debt; most specifically, credit cards. If you do take out credit cards, pay off your minimum balances each month and plan ahead for spending in large amounts. Should one fall into debt’s way, there are services available that can assist in managing the situation and ease the transition of filing for bankruptcy or consolidating.

Of course, even if you are forced to make a large purchase on a credit card that you cannot pay back immediately or maybe you even wish to bump your credit score up by maintaining a balance for a short period then you can still stay out of debt by planning ahead. Just make sure you give yourself the shortest period of time to pay it off. You may realize what an interest rate is, but make sure you understand the implications of one and how it alters the repayment period of your temporary loan.

2.) Begin building your cash cushion. Keep some of your money in a savings account that you don’t touch except to make deposits. At this point, you may not think you’ll save a lot but you’d be surprised how money can accumulate once you plan ahead. You may want to go with a traditional savings account for this but do remember that there are alternatives. A certificate of deposit (CD in the USA) or Guaranteed Investment Certificate (GIC in Canada) won’t let you touch your money for a period of time but if you don’t need access to it then this is a safe and easy way to let your money start making money for you.

Mostly though, developing the practice of saving money in any form is what you’re after. Make sure you try doing it as a percentage of your income instead of a lump dollar amount. This will ensure that when you work jobs with higher income in the future, your savings rate will remain similar in your mind but the total amount saved will be significantly larger.

3.) Invest if you can. If you have extra money and want to begin investing, then there is a lot to consider. The safest bets might be with government bonds, municipal bonds, and even corporate bonds. Each one has its own sets of risks and rewards, so doing your homework is important. Also, consider mutual funds. There is tremendous diversity with mutual funds and what’s better they can begin exposing you to the stock market. This means that you can begin building small cash surpluses while you learn what to do with them in the future.

4.) Account for college. Take your future school costs into consideration now before you take out student loans. By understanding what taking out a loan entails and by utilizing a budget before you ever go to school you can avoid the burden of significant student loan debt and the lack of a plan to repay it. More than anything, what you’re building in your teenage years are good habits. And just as this is true in social settings, professional settings, and educational settings, it can also be true of you financial future.

 

Dave Landry Jr. is a personal finance manager and debt relief counselor who has only recently started blogging to share his expertise on those matters and more. He hopes that you enjoy this article.

 

Toginet Radio interview with Steve Jorgenson

togonet_logo.jpgHere is a 15-minute Internet interview about Findependence Day with Toginet Radio’s Steve Jorgenson, which aired this morning (Sunday, August 18th).

It you have difficulty accessing the clip, just go to Toginet.com and check the schedule for Sunday, August 18th: the 11 am time slot. It’s under Recent Shows over to the right.

The clip contains interviews with three authors: the Findependence Day interview with me is the second of three, and you can go directly to about the 19.48 minute mark on iTunes if you don’t have time to listen to them all.

The host does a nice job in teasing out where the name Findependence came from, to explain what the expression “Freedom, Not Stuff” means, the need for financial literacy, the difference between retirement and findependence and other things.

Independence Day and Financial Independence

Findependence Day US Edition

Now that Independence Day has come and gone, perhaps it’s time to start thinking about your Financial Independence Day, or my contraction for the same thing: Findependence Day.

Whether it arrives in the near future or many moons from now, we know that the day of leaving the workforce must some day arrive. The timing may or may not be under your control: health and employer willingness to retain your services also come into the picture. What IS under your control is the financial resources you can mobilize to maximize your freedom and flexibility once this event occurs. And this must be done while you’re still gainfully employed.

One difference in these terms is that while Independence Day comes around every year, Financial Independence Day is a more unique event. It’s not carved in stone, of course, and can be moved forward and backward depending on circumstances.

The illustration is from the cover of the new US edition of Findependence Day, complete with fireworks and balloons. The calendar depicted is from the future (2027), and July 4th is circled as the “Financial Independence Day” of one of the lead characters in the book – for this is a novel as well as a financial primer for young people just entering the workforce and embarking on family formation.

Recent reviews

The point, as financial planner Sheryl Garrett remarked in a recent Marketwatch.com review of four books (including this one) is that the book’s title is about making a target: a point in the future you are working toward: “Findependence Day is the day you have choices and freedom. It’s redefining retirement and reaching financial independence.” Sheryl wrote the foreword to the book, which you can access via this free preview here at Amazon.com.

You can also read a blog on the book just published at NextAvenue.org, tied to the Independence Day theme — here — as well as a podcast on the book, where  Al Emid interviews me for New Books in Investment: here.

Posted July 2nd, is this review from Book Pleasures’ Conny Crisalli, which is also posted on Amazon.com here. Click on “newest reviews.”

And finally, on July 4th (yes, Independence Day) is this interview with Preet Banerjee on his “Mostly Money” audio podcast.

The power of visualization

Anyone familiar with goal-setting and visualization will know that, as I say in the book, there’s some power in setting an actual date in the future as a goal by which something is to be achieved. Jamie feels that on the day he turns 50, his income from all sources will exceed the income he could get from a sole employer and so he will become “findependent.”

I note that there are starting to emerge other books that also focus in on Financial Independence rather than Retirement, even though the term so beloved of the financial industry and the media is Retirement. In his recent non fiction book, Financial Independence: Getting to Point X, author and financial advisor John Vento describes Point X as the inflection point when financial independence is achieved. I”ve not yet read the book or talked to the author but it seems to me that Point X and Findependence Day are very similar concepts.

It’s worth reading Wikipedia’s entry on Financial Independence, which reads as follows.

   … the state of having sufficient personal wealth to live, without having to work actively for basic necessities. For financially independent people, their assets generate income that is greater than their expenses.

I first became aware of that entry just a few weeks ago when I wrote a guest blog for fee-only planner Roger Wohlner, aka The Chicago Financial Planner.  Since I’d finished the book by then it had no bearing on the book but the concept was not dramatically different.

Seek Findependence, Not Retirement

As I wrote for Roger in a blog entitled “Seek Findependence, Not Retirement,” the two terms are not the same. To be sure, you can’t really have retirement if you don’t first achieve financial independence, but seen the other way around, you can be financially independent and yet not choose to retire. Just look around at any big success in the business or art worlds and you’ll see the truth of that. Mick Jagger is findependent but still rocking, and the same can be said for Warren Buffett, Mark Zuckerberg and any number of other artists, musicians, actors and other celebrities.

Most of us are not born on Independence Day but we can all pick a date in the future – not necessarily a birthday – circle a figurative calendar and declare “That’s my Findependence Day.”

A warning though. It’s quite possible that the day after Findependence Day will be very little different than the day before. It happened that I turned 60 in April, almost to the day when the US edition of the book was published. fireworksAs I related on my Financial Independence blog at MoneySense.ca, I hosted the world’s first Findependence Day Party, complete with balloons and fireworks. The following Monday, I was back at my day job at MoneySense magazine.

Findependence works in concert with related concepts like early retirement, phased retirement and even sabatticals and staycations. My thoughts on the latter can be seen in the blog published just before the one you’re reading now: Rehearsals for Retirement.

To everyone in America, I wish a happy Independence Day.

 

Rehearsals for Retirement

ochscoverIf you like folksingers from the 1960s, you’re probably familiar with Phil Ochs, who sang “I ain’t marching anymore” and many more catchy protest songs. He came to a sad end (self-inflicted) and one of his last albums was entitled Rehearsals for Retirement. (Yes, I still have the original vinyl and the song title is actually one of the chapter titles in Findependence Day).

That title also serves as today’s blog title and happens to be a key strategy for those who are pursuing financial independence. I’m taking this week off from my day job at MoneySense but it’s more or less a “Staycation”: a working vacation spent at home. Other terms for this are “Veranda Beach” or (in Quebec), “Balconville.”

In the book, I write that the day after Findependence may well be the same as the days and weeks before: you continue to practice whatever craft or profession that got you to Findependence. You’re not “retired,” you’re still productive and you still wish to be engaged in the world, connecting with the workplace, colleagues, friends and family — either virtually or physically.

Definition of Findependence

Let’s step back a second and review the definition of financial independence (findependence for short). I wrote about this on my Financial Independence blog last week at MoneySense.ca, which you can find here. Based on how I interpret the Wikipedia definition of financial independence, it is a prerequisite for retirement: that is, you can’t have retirement without findependence, but on the flip side, you CAN have findependence without retirement. Findependence is also the precursor to such variations on retirement as phased retirement,  semi-retirement and today’s theme of “rehearsals for retirement.”  A one-year “sabattical” is one long such rehearsal but as I write below, even a one-week paid vacation from your day job can be a rehearsal if it’s a working staycation.

Varieties of Staycations

There are I suppose two or three types of staycations: one is where you really take a vacation from work of any kind; another is where you continue to work, but on your own projects rather than an employer’s.  Your time being your own, you can also do a hybrid of these, which is the route I’m going this week: doing various errands and chores one normally might tackle on weekends, but also engaging in social media, writing and other work-like tasks.

As I experience this, I’m reflecting that a working staycation is very much like Och’s Rehearsals for Retirement. I have several friends who are both findependent and fully retired, in that they no longer perusue economic (money-making) activities. But of course, they end up as busy as anyone else: household chores, shopping and maintenance don’t go away even if full-time employment ceases to be. You may pursue various artistic or entrepreneurial activities that may or may not lead to economic reward down the road.

If you still have a day job but have reached the point where you have several weeks of paid vacation each year, you may find a working staycation an excellent trial run for retirement. When I wrote the first edition of Findependence Day in the summer of 2008, I began the writing during my paid vacation weeks from my newspaper staff columnist job. Since I had been a freelance writer for several years in the 1980s, I was familiar with the rhythmn of writing at home. At some point I can see finishing my journalism career in the same way, supplementing the various “Findependence” sources of multiple income with the odd freelance assignment, book royalties and the like.

As I write the first draft of the blog entry you’re now reading, I’m doing so on a MacBook Air in my back yard. The sun is shining, a waterfall is splashing into our fish pond, cardinals and blue jays are pecking away at a bird feeder and life is good. I’ll go back into the house to polish this and format it for the web but this is an example of the kind of life I describe as “findependence.”

If you’re contemplating such a step but unsure about whether you’re suited for it, I recommend trying a week or two of a working Staycation during paid leave from your current day job.

Not yet retirement, but perhaps a rehearsal for it!

Note to US book reviewers & financial bloggers

One of the activities in which I’m engaged this week is promotion of the US edition of Findependence Day. Any journalist in the mainstream media can request a review copy by emailing promotions@trafford.com.   If you’re a financial blogger or a financial planner with a newsletter or good social media followings, I’d be glad to mail you an access card in order to download the e-book edition in most major formats. I’ll also email you a Word file of the end-of-chapter summaries, such as the one below. You can reach me at jonathan@findependenceday.com.

Chapter 3 summary

Finally, as promised, here’s the next installment of the end-of-chapter summaries of the main lessons learned in the book:

Chapter 3: Poor Boy Blues

You can’t save by spending; Be an Owner, Not a Loaner

• Frugality needs to be a lifetime habit, ranging from brown-bagging work lunches to taking public transit half the time.

• Don’t just focus on cutting expenses through small sacrifices; find ways to increase your income.

• Beware financial industry gimmicks like “spend ‘n save” cards.

• Department store credit cards charge the highest rates of interest.

• The secret of building wealth is to be a business owner.

• Be an owner, not a loaner means investing in stocks rather than bonds; or better yet, starting your own business.

• While the biggest fortunes come from starting a business, most of us are better off diversifying our equity exposure through index funds or Exchange-Traded Funds (ETFs).

 

 

 

 

Retiring Retirement

falkHere’ a post from my Financial Independence blog at MoneySense.ca, posted this week from the Morningstar annual conference held in Toronto on Wednesday. Pictured is Michael Falk, a partner with Illinois-based Focus Consulting Group, and I’m reporting on his talk entitled Prime Minister, There’s a Hole in My Safety Net.

And as promised a few weeks back, here’s the second-chapter summary of financial lessons learned in the second chapter of the new US edition of Findependence Day:

Chapter 2: Money Money Money: It’s a Rich Man’s World

• The best investment is paying off debt

• A line of credit lets you consolidate high-interest loans at one combined lower interest rate.

• A more effective method is to spend less than you earn.

• Avoid paying only the minimum monthly payment on your credit card. Better yet, pay balances off in full and never pay a dime interest.

• Build a six-month cash cushion.

• Mutual funds offer young investors professional security selection and diversification and through equity funds, exposure to the stock market.

• Financial Independence is not the same thing as Retirement. It means you continue to work because you want to, not because you have to.

• As your portfolio grows, you can lower investment management costs by using a discount brokerage, buying low-cost passively managed investments, and engaging a fee-only financial planner.

• During Semi-Retirement or the “First Retirement” you can give back to the community by volunteering, and discover talents you never knew you had.

 

 

 

Seek Findependence, not Retirement

wohlner66This week, I did a guest blog on Roger Wohlner’s blog, The Chicago Financial Planner, which you can find here.  As I note there, Roger [pictured on the left] is the kind of fee-only financial planner I recommend in Findependence Day. By the way, Roger is a must-follow on Twitter as @rwohlner

As you can note in the comments section which follow that post, people are becoming more aware of this paradigm shift and the distinction the book makes between traditional “Retirement” and Financial Independence (or “Findependence”).

As one commented, by viewing the goal as Findependence rather than full-stop retirement, he was able to move his “retirement” date up by 15 years.

Related to this concept is a blog I did here a few months ago about Early Findependence being a more achievable goal than Early Retirement. I note in this weekend’s Financial Post, a package of stories about extreme saving (I’d call that ‘guerrilla frugality”) by Melissa Leong, including a profile of a couple who supposedly “retired” at 35.

We’ve seen these stories before of course: Derek Foster and Dianne Nahirny both wrote books describing how they retired in their 30s. But of course, they were really describing Findependence since if nothing else they were still “working” by writing books how about how they stopped working!

 

 

 

The day after Findependence Day

magazine-issueSome may wonder why if I celebrated my Findependence Day and 60th birthday party over the weekend (see previous blog), then why on earth am I still going to work to engage in the stressful job of putting out a worldclass personal finance magazine.

My answer ran today on my sister blog housed at MoneySense.ca, which we call the Financial Independence blog.

Here it is in its entirety.

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