Canadian e-book on Financial Independence launches

CdnEBookCover2Today, the Canadian edition of my new “Novel Series” of e-books on Financial Independence launched on Amazon.com and Amazon.ca. You can see the full title and cover in the image to the left. Those who pre-ordered should already have it on their devices.

This is the first update to the original full novel published first in Canada in 2008, and the basis for this web site. However, it is a kind of workbook companion to the novel, and at 15,000 words much shorter.

The main body of the e-book is a chapter-by-chapter summary of the story, followed by the main lessons learned by the characters. Since it’s relatively short, the price is just C$3.37 or US$2.99. (A U.S. version of the e-book launched on Nov. 3rd.)

Remember Coles Notes?

Think of it as a “Coles Notes” (or in the U.S., Cliff Notes) for people who are more interested in the content on financial independence than the story. (Come on, admit it. Remember the time in high school when you didn’t bother to read King Lear and read only the Coles Notes version! And you still got a B!)CliffnotesRomeoAndJulietCover

Or maybe you read the story once just for fun (Findependence Day, that is, not King Lear) and forgot to underline key passages containing financial lessons. This e-book is a quick refresher course and of course available on mobile devices that go where a physical book may not.

Aimed at educators, financial advisors, credit counsellors and parents

Apart from being a companion guide and refresher course for readers of the full novel, the e-books were designed for four main groups and their constituencies: teachers of finance, financial literacy or personal finance and their students; financial advisors and their clients; credit counsellors and their debt-encumbered clients; and finally parents and their children. The full books are meant to act as the “spoonful of sugar that makes the medicine go down,” the medicine being the financial lessons that have been highlighted in the short ebooks.

At its sites, Amazon provides a “Look Inside” feature that lets potential buyers sneak a free peek at the content. So you can see my new introduction, foreword and the first chapter summary. And of course, with Christmas just around the corner, Amazon also lets you specify the e-book as a gift. As you can see in our ad at the top of the new site at Findependence.TV, $3.37 is a small price to pay for something that could literally change a young person’s life. It takes just a minute to download and perhaps an hour to read.

Think that’s an exaggeration about being potentially life-changing? Read this article by a millennial who read the original novel and is now well on the way to becoming “findependent” (or at least mortgage free) by age 31.

Supplements the Novel

This ebook makes a good supplement to the novel, since it includes a few extras that were in the full U.S. edition of Findependence Day published in 2013. That includes a glossary that didn’t appear in the original Canadian novel, plus an updated bibliography of about 75 financial books from “Theo’s Kindle.” (Theo is one of two financial planner characters in the story). Most of those book listings have live links to the actual books at Amazon.

Some readers tell me they don’t own a Kindle. That doesn’t mean you can’t read these ebooks on other devices. Amazon provides a free Kindle App that lets you read Kindle ebooks on devices like the Apple iPhone and iPad, as well as the various Kindle e-readers made by Amazon.

While the U.S. edition of the full novel was available in paperback and hard cover and all e-book formats, including both Kindle and all the rest, there is still no Kindle version of the full Canadian novel. That may happen in 2015 but for those who have asked for it, we hope this new e-book is a start. And of course, it has been revised to stay current.

 

 

Save money & space on consuming culture

Public library lends both physical and digital books. Photo by J. Chevreau

Public library lends both physical and digital books. Photo by J. Chevreau

I’ve been watching Orange is the New Black on Netflix lately, which has got me thinking about the possessions we really need in retirement or semi-retirement. Yes, retirement can be expensive if you insist on multiple residences, luxury vehicles and frequent exotic locations. On the other hand, you can get by on a lot less and as the old saying has it, the best things in life are free.

Were I to be in the unfortunate situation of doing time in a maximum-security prison, I think I’d be relatively content as long as I was permitted to have one small device: my Apple iPhone 5S or its equivalent from other companies. Of course, we’d need Internet access to to make it useful.

iphone_5s_apple_store

All you’d need if you were incarcerated?

Consider what you can do in the palm of your hand with any modern SmartPhone: you can read e-books, listen to music (I recently downloaded Leonard Cohen’s excellent new album, Popular Problems, on iTunes). Watch movies on Netflix, Hulu etc., and of course engage in all sorts of personal interactions on social media, keep abreast of the latest news from electronic newspapers anywhere, or digital magazines.

Not all of this cornucopia comes free but a lot of it does. Many people use Twitter feeds as a substitute for subscriptions to newspapers, for example. New tablet apps like Next Issue let you subscribe to more than a hundred magazines for $10 or $15/month, depending on whether you want the weeklies or just monthlies.

Libraries have joined the digital age

popup-paperwhite-diffFor books, I’m a big fan of Amazon’s Kindle Paperwhite, shown on the left alongside an earlier version of the device. It’s true that many new releases cost $9.99 or more but you can find many classics of literature for free or next to it. I have previously described a money-saving strategy whereby you download the free book sample on to your Kindle, while simultaneously putting a hold on the physical copy of the book at your local library. That way, you get a bit of instant gratification but also save money. Eventually, you have so many books on hold that there’s a steady flow of books you may have ordered weeks or even months earlier.

You can even get e-books totally free by “borrowing” them from the same library that lends out physical books. Download a free library app called Overdrive, which I’ve installed on both the iPad and iPhone. It works on some other devices but sadly not yet on the Kindle PaperWhite I favor. Overdrive lets you borrow ebooks, audio books, videos and music: they only allocate so many copies of any given work so just like a physical book on hold, you may have to wait until those first in line have received their copies and “returned it.” They don’t actually return ebooks: they merely are stripped automatically off your device after the three-week holding period.

The golden age of downloadable music?

For music, I’ve always been a big collector of CDs and, once upon a time, vinyl records. I still store them at home but most of my new purchases are via iTunes and the cloud. The plus is I don’t have to keep buying new CD holders and — eventually — find ways of adding new space to accommodate them, as well as physical books.

beautiful teenage listening music on the clouds

Music via the cloud: DepositPhoto

Downloadable music may or may not be free. While the days of Napster are over, any young person will give you names of apps that may let you sample music, either particular songs or entire albums. One I’ve tried is called Grooveshark, which can be installed on a PC or Mac and paired with a smartphone with a related app called gsremote.com. This is a free streaming service that lets you listen to music as long as you have wireless access. Presumably, if you decide after a few listens that you like the music, you’d buy it on iTunes or purchase a physical copy in the stores the old-fashioned way. There are of course many other free music streaming services, like Songza, that stream mood music according to the event you have in mind.

Say goodbye to self-storage

As we noted in the “Greatest Tips” package in the June issue of MoneySense, all this free or low-cost electronic culture doesn’t take anywhere near as much storage space as the old-fashioned library. The proliferation of physical books, videos, DVDs, CDs and  vinyl  has definitely slowed down at our home as more of it gets stored in the cloud. I can see that at some point it would be possible to downside to a smaller home or condo, at which point all the physical content could be sold , with all new content going up on the cloud.

Hopefully, it won’t come to just an iPhone in a prison cell, but the general trend is there. We can get by with a lot less stuff, and space to store it in, and downsizing shouldn’t be a huge loss even if you love literature, movies, music and the rest of it. For retirees, this means they will have both freedom and simplicity, plus an abundance of affordable popular culture to help them fill all that time.

 

Findependence Day now available on iPad, iPhone, Kobo, Sony, iBooks, PCs

ipad-3-concept.pngThe new U.S. edition of Findependence Day is now available in e-book format for $3.99 in the major tablet formats:

Sony e-reader, Kobo, iBooks, iPad, iPhone, Stanza, Bluefire (OS & Android), Kindle and in PDF format for various Personal Computers. Go to Trafford.com here to order. Kindle version is from Amazon.com here.

Amazon Kindle reviews

Amazon-Kindle1Wanted to share a nice review on the Amazon Kindle site today about the new US edition of Findependence Day.

Here’s what Rob has to say:

A unique and well-written book that is doing something important….. it is teaching you more about becoming financially independent than anything else out there. The narrative story is easy to follow for those who would never read a financial book and a nice format change for those who would. Well worth it – enjoy. 

 

Kindle edition of Findependence Day (US edition) now at Amazon.com

Findependence Day Book from Jonathan CheverauThe Kindle edition of the new American edition of Findependence Day is now available at Amazon.com, along with a free sneak preview of the new foreword by Garrett Planning Network’s Sheryl Garrett, plus the first two chapters.

Details here.